If in doubt, go for a cat video

It’s midterm, and midweek, and I’m out of inspiration. But this is funny:

Sometimes cats really do seem to come from another planet.

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Three Things Make a “Post”

Let’s start with the delightful “blog” of “unnecessary” quotation marks. Along with the proliferation of apostrophes where no apostrophe needs to be, we see “quotation marks” all over the place. Someone is keeping track and commenting dryly on them.

I find this one fascinating: The Book Depository Live. Watch in real time as people all over the world buy books. Why I should be mesmerized by seeing someone buying Neil Gaiman’s Anansi Boys in Sweden, I don’t really know. It’s the magic of the WWW.

And a link for Shakespeare buffs to add to their bookmarks: Shakespeare and Film: A Microblog. Great source of news on new and old movie versions, dvd releases (including David!! Tennant’s!! Hamlet!!!), and useful YouTube clips.

The Seven Deadly Sins of Plagiarism

Beware of the following:

Lust: your sinful desire for a good grade leads you to the ever-so-tempting paper mills.

Gluttony: overindulgence in the works of others.

Greed: desire for a better grade than you deserve.

Sloth: sheer laziness either in failure to do your own thinking and writing, or thinking that you don’t need to follow instructions or cite according to the required format.

Wrath: inappropriate feeling of hatred, revenge or even denial towards your instructor or the institution for imposing what you feel are unjust rules.

Envy: resentment of others for their hard work and careful attention to detail.

Pride: thinking you are above the law, too clever to get caught, or too “artistic” to need to follow the required format for citation.

Language is…

A student in my English 280 class sent me this. I love Fry and Laurie, and Stephen Fry gets the “pretentious talking head” absolutely dead-on.

Advice to Students

Just in time for the beginning of term comes this post from the always amusing Little Professor.

She provides a list of notes on “Dealing with Professors” that any teacher will find all-too-familiar. Students: take note!